Tag: health care

Asthma Self-Management Education: Role of the Subspecialist

Role of the Subspecialist Leadership in the use, dissemination, refinement, and adaptation of the available self-management education programs rests with the cardiopulmonology, allergy, and immunology communities. This leadership will take several forms. First, practitioners can adapt existing programs for use in their private practices or encourage the adoption of programs by the institutions with which they collaborate. Second, practitioners can introduce the idea of self-management tasks, as identified in the studies discussed here, into their ongoing counseling of patients and…

Continue Reading »

Asthma Self-Management Education: Implications for Practice

Asthma Self-Management Education: Implications for Practice

In one way or another, each of these self-management programs stresses the need for a regular systematic approach to care of patients with asthma including the consistent use of medication as prescribed by the physician, the need to avoid triggers of asthma when these are known, and to initiate early drug therapy when this is not possible. These activities, together with effective communication with physicians, facilitate what has been referred to here as a partnership between the patient (and family)…

Continue Reading »

Asthma Self-Management Education: Research in Asthma Self-Management

Managing asthma at home is a complex problem for most families, one that requires not only appropriate responses in the face of a wheezing episode, but efforts to prevent the onset of attacks, and attempts to reduce psychologic and social burdens that asthma imposes. Until recently, there were few models of systematic attempts beyond counseling provided by individual physicians to help patients improve their self-management skills. No rigorous evaluations of asthma education and counseling had been undertaken. In less than…

Continue Reading »

Asthma Self-Management Education

Asthma Self-Management Education

Research and Implications for Clinical Practice Some of the early impetus for health education programs in asthma stemmed from concerns by physicians that the conventional interactions between doctors and patients with asthma were not having the intended effects of improving long-term respiratory health. Poor understanding of the complexities of asthma and inadequate adherence to prescribed medical regimens were associated with poor control of asthma. More recent impetus for health education programs has come from behavioral scientists and public health oriented…

Continue Reading »